Category Archives: Life Improvement

Against Escapism

The issue with fleeing reality into video games, sci-fi and fantasy novels

Escapism is one of the major issues plaguing young white men. Hardly any young white man is not a gamer of some sort. If not a gamer, he immerses himself in board games and novels of fantasy or sci-fi. The more disciplined and intelligent of them might use this to develop some skills, such as the boy who learns to build computers and learns to code to better run his games, or the boy who reads sci-fi and becomes interested in physics and technology and starts reading actual scientific works or developing rudimentary technical skills. But these are far and few between, the vast majority are passive consumers. As in anything, the majority is passive and a few are born to be more skilled, ambitious and to achieve more and strive higher. This is exactly why a society needs guidance and institutions to maintain social cohesion. Leave individuals on their own and some few will still have achievements, overcoming all obstacles, and others will end up weighing in at 200kg unable to leave their house.

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SALI #2 – Ulysses Pact against the sirens of distraction

The name Ulysses pact comes from an Greek Myth by Homer, the Odyssey. In this myth at some point the protagonist Ulysses (which is Latin it’s Odysseus in Greek) wants to hear the siren song. However it is commonly known that no man is able to resist the call of the sirens. Thus he makes a pact with his crew. Whilst they all stuff their ears with beeswax so as not to be able to hear the song, he is bound to the mast and the crew promise not to untie him until well out of range of the sirens. 

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Simple Actionable Life Improvement #1 – Introduction

Self-help has gotten a bad name over the past few years and to be honest somewhat rightly so. This is partly due to the slow but steady decline of the popular myth of “becoming the best version of yourself” as though there is even such a thing as a “best version of you” or even a “self”. Add to this the horribly American way in which most self-help books are written, like how Dale Carnegie still seems to deem it necessary to market the book to you on page 60 in “How to win friends and influence people” with its endless anecdotes about the effectiveness of the techniques. And lastly, the general lack of any scientific underpinnings of the marketed techniques should be examples of why self help really isn’t very much of a Continental-European thing.

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